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our look at the fallout from this year's presidential election with frank rich, the former ku near times writer. his piece in the magazine this week is called "fighting sea- fantasyland." he joins us tonight from new york. good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you as always. thank you. tavis: i would want to start with the news of the day. there is so much news. congress is back in session for this lame duck session as it were. clearly, the top of the agenda for them and i suspect for the nation is how they keep the country from going over what has been referred to as the fiscal cliff. a lot easier to say then sequestration trade your thoughts on how serious both sides have to be or if in fact will be in coming to some grand bargain, some solution. these days following the election. >> they will be fairly serious. the first thing that has to happen is the republicans have to get over their shock of losing an election they thought they were going to win. we realize their leverage is rather limited. already we're seeing certainly that in the case of john boehner
democrat to win two terms in more than 100 years. a look at what this election means for the nation and president and for both parties with larry king. he continues to cover politics and more on his new show, "larry king now." join us for conversation about election night. coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we continue to digest the results of last night, i could not think of a better person to break down the results that a man who has covered so many of these. how many? since what year? >> on the broadcast of 1960. >> i was born in 1964. >> stop it. i was on the radio and television in 1960. it was the first televised debate. tavis: i remember this. >> nixon
presidential election behind us, perhaps we can get past the petty bickering and focus on the issues on our lives. the so-called war on drugs, eugene jarecki turns his lens on the drug issue. his new documentary is called "the house i live in" and was awarded at the sundance festival. conversation with eugene jarecki coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: eugene jarecki is an award winning filmmaker whose previous projects include "why we fight." is the latest project is "the house we live in." here are some scenes. >> you have to understand the war on drugs has never been about drugs. >> americas public enemy number one is a drug abuse. >>
, with the elections in the senate in the house and states across the country come increasingly these ballot measures are becoming important. >> prop. 36 was an amazing moment for california and also for the nation. as you may know, california has had the most draconian three strikes law in america. under california law, until election day, it was the case that you could get a third strike that would put you in jail for life, even if the third strike was petty or non-violent, like stealing a slice of pizza or stealing sox. these are cases where people got life sentences. so the california voters, god bless him, have made a victory -- a major victory for the country. a petty or non-run defense cannot put you in prison for life. going forward, there are 35 people in california whose sentences will now be revisited, people whose life sentences will be far proved. and there thousands more who would have gone life sentences for completely petty and nonviolent crimes and now won't. it is humane and it will save the state about $150 million a year. i want to see that resonated across the country. tavis: wha
-- that a well-oiled machine could take an office boy and have him elected to the senate. he was so far over his head when he became vice president and the president, he had a recurring nightmare that the secret service would tell him that result was dead. he knew that he was not up for it. -- that roosevelt was dead. he knew that he was not up for it. he is clearly not capable. he tells everybody he meets with for the first two weeks that it is a terrible mistake, that he is not big enough, not smart enough, that somebody else should really become president. they told them he had to bulk up and at least believe that he could be present for everybody would lose faith. unfortunately, he makes the wrong decision and almost every case. he falls in line with the british thinking, with his anti- suited hard-liners who say that the soviet union are breaking -- anti-soviet hard-liners who say that the soviet union are breaking all of their agreements. truman took this hard-line that the soviets were cheating and breaking their agreements and it took a steadily down the path toward confrontation, with r
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: for more tonight on the election of 2012 and what it means beyond the results, i am pleased to be joined by amy goodman. she is the host of "democracy now!" and her new book is called "the silent majority." she joins us from new york. good to have you back on this program. >> it is great to be with you, tavis. tavis: there so as to talk about. your thoughts on what happened this week, giuliani presidential race and whether you were surprised by any of the results. >> i definitely thought that president obama would win. when you look at what mitt romney said along the way, when you looked at his actions, when you look at the 47%, i wondered if he would win, if his number would be 47%, talking about the people who would not vote for him. but president obama, now in his second term, i think presents us an extremely interesting challenge to many of the people who voted for him. i mean, you now have the community organizer in chief as the commander-in-chief. that started in 2008. the question is who does the community org
to take part in the election. not just that but also as representatives. the fast of the american public service has changed profoundly. i'm not doing this to pay tribute to amy. i also believe this is going to be century of women in america and there has to be acknowledgment of that. >> what do you mean going to be. >> well it is. and it's taking place and i say that and i'm the father of three daughters and a remarkable wife and four grand daughters. but you look at every conceivable thing and that ought to be encouraged more than it is and the prefile ought to be raised because we're going to need everybody to solve this. >> rose: with that thank you very much tom brokaw, thank you jon meacham, thank you amy gutmann, thank you tom friedman and thank you david brooks. captioning sponsored by rose communications captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org th tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, what we can expect with a second term from obama in the white house. we have amy goodman. obama has to set a second agenda. aboutodman's recent book att
inkling that the whitehouse, through a formal channel, informal channel before the election that people just kind of sat on and then it went in a more formal chain of command way, they acted instantly once he heard about it. was there something before then, as john said a minute ago, in this full scale investigation that will be a key question. >> i agree about why it didn't make its way up the chain of command. however, in some of these cases there are people inside the whitehouse that make sure the president is inoculated from learning, exactly. so usually it's the whitehouse chief of staff who does that. i think there's a question about whether there was someone in the whitehouse that knew about it and there was a political decision given that this was two weeks, a week out from the whitehouse a couple days whenever then they knew about it, to not tell the president for possible deniability for that very reason which could certainly have happened. >> rose: this is what's interesting. john miller sitting here with us worked for general clacker, the dni as they say. >> i was the deput
to become a war president. remember the education president? that got blown up by a war. obama was elected on a domestic agenda. he wants to be the guy you gotta side of iraq and afghanistan. and did not destroy his domestic agenda. lbj hasted great domestic agenda and had -- had this great domestic agenda but was ruined as a president by the vietnam war. when you walk into the oval office, president obama looks up and he sees the vietnam general walking hand. you are his worst nightmare. i am here to ruin your presidency. i think is a hard problem. the media does not want to pay attention. we just have a presidential campaign with the war in afghanistan hardly mentioned. i would be appalled if i were a parent who had a kid in afghanistan. what does that say about us? we're putting our kids out there. it says we are not taking our wars seriously. we're fighting for them but we're fighting them with a casual air against. if you're going to go to work, pay some -- war, pay some damn attention. the sense of not having skin in the game in this country, it really bothers me. tavis: that is a so
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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